GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.

Your raffle might be subject to gaming commission or tax laws. Check with your municipality, state or province, and federal governments to make sure your raffle is legal. These government departments aren’t just enforcers. They are often great resources on how to run a successful fund raising raffle. Raffles are fun! Getting in trouble with the law or tax man is not.
As far as threading the frames, is it that you don't understand threading? You accomplish that by using the selection tool to click in the outport box (the larger square near the lower right corner of the text frame), then clicking inside the frame you want to be next in the thread. Repeat as often as required, selecting the outport of the last frame you threaded each time. Text will now flow automatically from the first frame to the end of the thread. You can work backwards, too, if you wish, by selecting the inport (upper left) instead of the outport.
There are two schools of thought regarding how numeric version numbers are incremented. Most free and open-source software packages, including MediaWiki, treat versions as a series of individual numbers, separated by periods, with a progression such as 1.7.0, 1.8.0, 1.8.1, 1.9.0, 1.10.0, 1.11.0, 1.11.1, 1.11.2, and so on. On the other hand, some software packages identify releases by decimal numbers: 1.7, 1.8, 1.81, 1.82, 1.9, etc. Decimal versions were common in the 1980s, for example with NetWare, DOS, and Microsoft Windows, but even in the 2000s have been for example used by Opera[7] and Movable Type.[8] In the decimal scheme, 1.81 is the minor version following 1.8, while maintenance releases (i.e. bug fixes only) may be denoted with an alphabetic suffix, such as 1.81a or 1.81b.
The EASY way to set up the text file is to use Excel to make a grid the number of sheets wide by the number of tickets per sheet deep. Put the first number in the upper left cell, then fill consecutively to the right until the number of columns is equal to the number of sheets you will print, then move down a row and do the same thing with the next numbers, and so on until you've finished the grid.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
This program makes you adept for not only creating event tickets but also generating attractive resumes and different menus. What you need to do is to find the appropriate Microsoft template and include the desired texts in the blanks available. The program then allows you to opt for the color of your choice .subsequently you can either save the template as a file or you can click on the print right away.
Thank you very much, I will attempt to follow these directions and feed a job. I use a placed PDF that is already a 4 up layout for raffle tickets and usually require 2 placements of the number per ticket, total of 4 columns (2 each x 4)in text boxes and placed from an excel .csv file. I hope I can figure out how to make this work with your "easier method".
Single sheet order means that your tickets will be printed one after the other, in normal numerical order (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.) in column form.  With Single Sheet Order, the numbers 1-8 print on the first page, 9-16 on the second page, and so on.  This style is useful for handing out tickets to buyers individually on the day of the drawing or event.
Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.
I came across this website that explained how to do it using Microsoft's "Raffle Ticket" template (https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-create-numbered-tickets-in-word). However, when I tried to update the sequences as the article said, I could not find the option to update the field (I think they were referring to the option "edit field"), after copying and pasting the template onto a second page.
We are providing up to 30 different raffle ticket template designs representing different events for you to download to your computer. These templates are professionally designed in Microsoft Word and can be used to create a series of ticket numbers on each ticket within Microsoft Word. We guarantee that by using our raffle ticket templates, you will be creating professional looking raffle tickets for your fund-raising events.
Now click on the Microsoft Office Word Help option. Consequently, to the right side of the word document, a support box will pop up. You can easily look for the option Search for and after you find this box, you need to type Create numbered tickets and hit on the green arrow. This Help feature will do all the work for you and it will enlist a number of relevant choices in the area of your search. (501 Microsoft Templates)
We are providing up to 30 different raffle ticket template designs representing different events for you to download to your computer. These templates are professionally designed in Microsoft Word and can be used to create a series of ticket numbers on each ticket within Microsoft Word. We guarantee that by using our raffle ticket templates, you will be creating professional looking raffle tickets for your fund-raising events.
I am creating a file in inDesign for a client that is asking for numbered tickets. They'd like to be able to print a specific number for each ticket. I've read some of the older answers for similar questions that refer to Data Merge, but I'd prefer not to take that route if avoidable. What I'd ultimately like to do is create a space for the numbers to go, select the number of pages within the Print menu, and have the spaces populate with the corresponding numbers while printing.
I am using your instructions to create a page of tickets - the design has been created as a picture so I added a text box to "hold" the mail merge instructions but I keep getting the error message "You cannot include DATA, NEXT, NEXTIF, or SKIPIF fields in comments, headers, footers, footnotes or endnotes." I have not included any of these but I'm wondering if it's because I've attempted to insert it in a text box. Is there an easy way to do this? TIA
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